Our Results

At Inspirica, we believe that how you get a result is as important as the result itself, so our work centers on building the confidence and habits each student needs to meet any challenge head-on. Every aspect of the test-taking process can and must be practiced, which is why learning test strategy and taking practice tests are just as central to our programs as studying content and doing assigned homework. Great scores are earned, and our tutors work every day to channel a student’s hard work in the most productive and efficient direction possible.

We’ve worked with all types of students – from those aiming for perfect scores on the ACT or SAT, to those looking to hit specific thresholds on the LSAT so that they can apply to the top law schools, and everything in between. Whatever your goals, with hard work and our help, your best score is within reach.

Four Keys to Program Success

1 Tutoring Sessions
2 Homework
3 Practice Tests
4 Multiple Test Dates
1 Tutoring Sessions

Most programs meet once each week for somewhere between 90 minutes and two hours. Sessions cover a mix of testing strategy and content and will include a thorough review of assigned homework and the discussion of new material. Each session builds on the last and is tailored to the individual performance of each student every week, so no two programs are ever exactly alike.

 

First sessions with an Inspirica tutor tend to cover a lot of ground . Our tutors begin by taking some time to get to know the student and his or her parents in order to better understand their goals for tutoring and testing. From there, they give the student an overview of the test and of the tutoring process, setting expectations for future sessions, homework, practice testing, and the most likely schedule of official test dates. Next, they walk each student through a short tour of the materials that will be used during the tutoring process, including any web systems that will be used for homework or practice testing. Finally, our tutors dive into one of the key strategies for test success, wrapping things up with a homework assignment that will drill that strategy and set up the next week’s work.

 

From there, programs diverge based on test-type. SSAT and ISEE programs focus on a mix of content and strategies from beginning to end, as younger students usually need both in equal measure throughout their programs. PSAT, SAT, and ACT programs, however, focus more on our core testing strategies than on the underlying concepts, as the primary challenge of these tests is their structure and their timing. Grad test programs are the most self-directed, as older students are usually much more aware of their own strengths and weakness even before tutoring begins and are therefore seeking very specific forms of support and assistance from the start.

 

Whatever the type of program, our tutors and staff prioritize open lines of communication through the process, offering regular student progress updates and clear explanations for any recommendations that are offered along the way. Standardized tests are hard, and preparation should be a team effort.

2 Homework

As with any kind of training, the results that you see will depend in large part on the work that you put in between sessions. To that end, your tutor will work with you to create a practice plan that is tailored to your specific strengths and weaknesses, your target score, and your timeline. Typical homework includes drills centered on specific content areas and practice with individual question-types, and tying it all together is perhaps the most important component – timed test sections. This blend of practice will ensure that you’re addressing every element needed to be successful on whatever test you’re taking, from content to timing to overall strategy, and your tutor will go over each assignment with you question by question to maximize what you get out of it.

 

Assignments are typically broken into multiple components that are to be completed on a few different days in the week between sessions. The total length of these assignments varies throughout each program based on individual student needs, but in general, students should expect roughly two to three hours of homework each week, with older students tending to complete more and younger students less.

3 Practice Tests

There are certain aspects of taking a standardized test that are impossible to replicate through homework alone, which is one of the reasons that regular practice tests are a staple of our programs. Your tutor will help you set up a schedule of periodic mock tests that will give you the opportunity to practice the techniques you’ve learned in the context of a full test while also familiarizing you with the experience of taking the full test straight through. Then, you and your tutor will go over the results together in detail, using them to revise your practice plan; you’ll be able to see the product of your hard work and determine what part of the test to attack next.

 

There are certain aspects of taking a standardized test that are impossible to replicate through homework alone, which is one of the reasons that regular practice tests are a staple of our programs. Your tutor will help you set up a schedule of periodic mock tests that will give you the opportunity to practice the techniques you’ve learned in the context of a full test while also familiarizing you with the experience of taking the full test straight through. Then, you and your tutor will go over the results together in detail, using them to revise your practice plan; you’ll be able to see the product of your hard work and determine what part of the test to attack next.

 

For ISEE, SSAT, SAT, and ACT programs, you’ll take previously released official tests or high-quality third-party tests using the Test Innovators platform, which tracks your work in real time on a question-by-question basis, allowing you and your tutor to deconstruct your results in order to pinpoint exactly why and how your right answers were right and your wrong answers wrong. For graduate test programs, you’ll use a combination of official tests and testing platforms, preparing you for both the test and its delivery system before you sit for your first official test date.

4 Multiple Test Dates

Part of beating any test is giving yourself as many opportunities as necessary to succeed. Particularly with the increased prevalence of superscoring, the process by which colleges combine scores from multiple test dates in order to produce your highest possible composite score, taking the test multiple times is a great way to maximize your improvement. Our team will work with you to craft a program timeline that fits your unique needs; after each official test administration, your tutor will go over your results with you and devise a plan of action to put you in the best possible position for the next test date.

The Tests We Tutor

ACT

ACT

The ACT is the first of two major tests used by colleges and universities during their admissions processes. Preparation typically begins near the end of a student's sophomore year or during the summer before their junior year, lasts roughly three months, and involves two or three official test dates. Our Agnostic Diagnostic test can help you decide whether the ACT or the SAT is the right test for you.

SSAT

SSAT

The Secondary School Admissions Test
is used for admission to private elementary and secondary schools throughout the United States. Preparation typically begins in the summer or very early fall, lasts three to four months, and involves at least two official test dates, of which one can be a "flex test" taken with a local education consultant.

PSAT

PSAT

The Preliminary SAT is not used during the college admissions process, but students seeking recognition in the annual National Merit Scholarship competition often spend a month or two preparing for the October test to maximize their chances for recognition. Prep therefore usually begins in the late summer or early fall of their junior years.

SAT Subject Tests

SAT Subject Tests

The SAT Subject Tests are a collection of 20 multiple-choice tests on individual subjects typically offered in high schools across the United States. Many colleges and universities require the submission of two or more subject test scores as part of a student's application. Preparation nearly always begins in the spring of the school year in which the student is taking the course, with test dates in late spring or summer.

ISEE

ISEE

The Independent School Entrance Exam is used for admission to private elementary and secondary schools throughout the United States. Preparation typically begins in the summer or very early fall, lasts three to four months, and involves at least two official test dates selected from the ISEE's peculiar "testing seasons" calendar.

SAT

SAT

The SAT is the second of two major tests used by colleges and universities during their admissions processes. As with the ACT, preparation typically begins near the end of a student's sophomore year or during the summer before their junior year, lasts roughly three months, and involves two or three official test dates. Our Agnostic Diagnostic test can help you decide whether the ACT or the SAT is the right test for you.

GRE

GRE

The Graduate Record Examination General Test is used by graduate programs across the United States in their admissions processes. The test involves a mix of math and verbal content that students frequently have not encountered since high school, so the preparation process usually involves a mix of tutoring and self-study. Testing is conducted at private facilities according to each student’s individual schedule, and students usually test multiple times to achieve their maximum scores.

GMAT

GMAT

The Graduate Management Admission Test is used by business schools throughout the United States for admissions. Like the GRE, this test involves material students often have not seen since high school, so preparation often requires a mix of extensive self-study and tutoring. Testing is done on individually scheduled dates and on a computer system that adapts the test to each student’s individual performance.

LSAT

LSAT

The Law School Admission Test is used for admission to law schools throughout the United States. As this is the most difficult of all the standardized tests used for school admissions, preparation tends to be extensive, often lasting six or more months and involving a dozen or more practice tests. Most students test two or three times, with the dates scheduled far in advance on a calendar like those of the SAT and ACT.

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